Posts Tagged ‘matthea harvey’


Matthea Harvey
Pity the Bathtub Its Forced Embrace of the Human Form
(buy).

“Show, don’t tell” serves as the general rallying cry for poetry, that which distinguishes itself from prose by using the best words in the best order with minimal reader hand-holding. Reading poetry is how people discover they are self-realized readers, able to reach and accept their own understandings and lack there of for what they are, interpretation, and stand confidently behind those thoughts.

Poetry, though, is tricky in that it is one of the few writing forms that constantly seeks to renew itself in the name of originality. The standard of poetry has changed much across chronology as well as geography. From lyrics and soothsayers to free verse and cubists, poetry has always strived to make something more out of form (or lack thereof) than what came before. This constant reinvention can make for some pretty high hurdles for casual adventurers in reading.

Matthea Harvey’s “Pity the Bathtub Its Forced Embrace of the Human Form,” is one such hurdle – a book so dense and intentionally/intelligently misguiding that it forces a need for concentration upon the reader. This is no casual read. This is poetry at a pinnacle, and Matthea Harvey issues with it an invitation to dig into the words the way only this particular art from can make at once challenging and rewarding through technique as well as the words themselves.

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Matthea Harvey
“Sad Little Breathing Machine”
(buy)

Trying to decide upon tents of unknown-to-me poets to visit by flipping through a brochure of Geraldine R. Dodge Poetry Festival attendees, I came upon a listing that featured one Matthea Harvey. This brief blurb of a bio mentioned her various accomplishments. Included within those accolades were the titles of her books, and it was one of those titles that immediately endeared the idea of Matthea Harvey to my mind.

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Admittedly, it is an outright shame I only went for one day, but the poetry and conversations encountered in that one day were enough to make me, a gluttinuous gobbler of poetry, overwhelmed. Highlight included the humour of Coleman Barks, the discovery of poets Matthea Harvey and Taha Muhammad Ali, and the intensity of Taslima Nasreen.

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